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This collection contains essays on various genres of oral traditions in Bhutan, as well as other cultural subjects. Each text is linked to relevant places and subjects, such that users can explore the rich tapestry of Bhutanese culture through different media.

Items in this collection

The list below includes items from this Collection's Subcollections.

Displaying 1 - 36 of 158 texts

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Samten Yeshi, Karma Phuntsho 2017

A view on the history, nomenclature, and traditional social organization of Ura, one of Bumthang district's four valleys.

Karma Phuntsho 2017 [2016]

A translation of a prayer for the long life of the Fourth King of Bhutan Jigme Singye Wangchuck (b. 1955) composed by the 70th Je Khenpo Jigme Choedra.

Sonam Chophel, Karma Phuntsho 2017

An overview of the eight types of Alo, secular songs of sorrow sung solo and generally alone.

Karma Phuntsho 2017

The history and development of archery as Bhutan's national game, played almost exclusively by men.

Karma Phuntsho 2017 [2016]
Karma Phuntsho 2017

Descriptions of the three types of water sources used for bathing in Bhutan: tshachu, menchu, and drupchu.

Karma Phuntsho 2017

An extremely brief summary of Bhutan's religious history, presented in three phases.

Karma Phuntsho 2017

A view on the building plans and cultural perceptions of temples built in Bhutan meant to emulate Guru Rinpoche's Copper Mountain Paradise.

Karma Phunsho 2017

The author's view on the state of bomena and its changed prominence and practices in modern Bhutan.

Karma Phuntsho 2017 [2016]

A summary of the rationale for Buddhist practitioners' taking refuge, the proper steps for doing so, and the role of refuge in the Buddha, Dharma, and Sangha.

Karma Phuntsho 2015 [2014]

Chag or prostration is fundamentally a practice of paying respect, but it is not about submission to others. It is aimed at getting rid of one’s greatest flaw, evil and enemy--the ego or the sense of I.

This piece was initially published in Bhutan’s national newspaper Kuensel in a series called "Why we do what we do".

Karma Phuntsho 2017 [2016]

An overview of the Chagya Chenpo (phyag rgya chen po), or Mahāmudrā, from the Bhutanese perspective.

Karma Phuntsho 2015 [2014]

Cham is a type of sacred dance unique to the Indo-Himalayan Buddhist culture. It is an extension of the Buddhist practice of visual offering of aesthetic movement, the mudra expression of enlightened spirit and of the artistic and entertaining expedience of passing a spiritual message.

This piece was initially published in Bhutan’s national newspaper Kuensel in a series called "Why we do what we do".

Karma Phuntsho 2017

The making of and uses for changkoe, a grain-based alcoholic foodstuff served at special occasions in Bhutan.

Karma Phuntsho 2015 [2014]

Mani is a popular ngag or mantra. Mani or oṃ maṇi padme huṃ, which is also known as the six syllable mantra, is the mantra of Avalokiteśvara or Chenrezig, the Buddha of compassion.

This piece was initially published in Bhutan’s national newspaper Kuensel in a series called "Why we do what we do".

Karma Phuntsho 2015 [2014]

There are different kinds of mantras. The innate mantra of reality is the ineffable nature of sound, which is simultaneously empty and audible. This state is expressed in the form of symbolic mantras, which are the syllables, letters and words, which we can chant and also hear.

This piece was initially published in Bhutan’s national newspaper Kuensel in a series called "Why we do what we do".

Karma Phuntsho 2015 [2014]

Chod is a very expedient Mahayana Buddhist practice primarily aimed at reducing and eliminating one’s sense of ego or attachment to oneself, using the tactics of fear and selfless giving.

This piece was initially published in Bhutan’s national newspaper Kuensel in a series called "Why we do what we do".

Karma Phuntsho 2015 [2014]

The recitation of Buddhist sutras is a very ancient tradition. After the Buddha passed away, his teachings were passed down orally for about three centuries. The master would recite and transmit the teachings to the disciple who will memorise, recite and pass it down again.

This piece was initially published in Bhutan’s national newspaper Kuensel in a series called "Why we do what we do".

Karma Phuntsho 2017

A summary of the contents and contexts that surround choesham, domestic Buddhist shrines in Bhutan.

Karma Phuntsho 2017

A summary of the types of chortens encountered in Bhutan, their construction and their functions.

Karma Phuntsho 2015 [2014]

The first month of the Bhutanese calendar is called Chothrul Dawa, literally the month of miracles. It is believed to be the month when Buddha performed many miracles.

This piece was initially published in Bhutan’s national newspaper Kuensel in a series called "Why we do what we do".

Sonam Chophel, Karma Phuntsho 2017

An overview of the eastern Bhutanese New Year alternately referred to as Chunyipai Losar, Sharchokpai Losar, and the Traditional Day of Offering.

Karma Phuntsho 2015 [2014]

Due to its cultural diversity engendered by geographic isolation, Bhutan has many different losar (ལོ་གསར་) or New Year celebrations.

This piece was initially published in Bhutan’s national newspaper Kuensel in a series called "Why we do what we do".

Karma Phuntsho 2017

A view on Dechen Monlam and its role in Bhutanese Buddhist practice.

Karma Phuntsho 2017

A summary of the constituent parts and social functions of doma pani, an addictive stimulant found throughout South and Southeast Asia.

Karma Phuntsho 2015 [2014]

Domang is a collection of many important short sutras. It literally means ‘many sutras’. It is also known as Zungdue or a compendium of zung or dhāraṇī texts.

This piece was initially published in Bhutan’s national newspaper Kuensel in a series called "Why we do what we do".

Karma Phuntsho 2017

An overview of the origins and performance of the Drametse Nga Cham, or Drum Dance of Dramitse, which was selected as a Masterpiece of Intangible Cultural Heritage in 2005.

Karma Phuntsho 2015 [2014]

Drubchen is an advanced form of ceremonial practice in Vajrayāna Buddhism.

This piece was initially published in Bhutan’s national newspaper Kuensel in a series called "Why we do what we do".

Karma Phuntsho 2017

One of a series of essays that explores the various names applied to Bhutan throughout its history; this one focuses on the name that Bhutanese call themselves and their nation.

Karma Phuntsho 2015 [2014]

Saga Dawa, the fourth Bhutanese month and equivalent of Vaiṣakha month in Indian calendar, is a duezang. Duezang, literally means, auspicious time. Due refers to time and zang means auspicious or good.

This piece was initially published in Bhutan’s national newspaper Kuensel in a series called "Why we do what we do".

Karma Phuntsho 2017

An introduction to a community festival held in Ura, Bumthang, to repel evil spirits.

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