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Karma Phuntsho 2017 [2016]
Christine Jewell
Christine Jewell
James Van Auken

Author Information:

James Van Auken, Vice President of Academic Affairs, Atlantic University

Email: james.vanauken@atlanticuniv.edu

Christine Jewell
Karma Phuntsho 2015 [2014]

Chag or prostration is fundamentally a practice of paying respect, but it is not about submission to others. It is aimed at getting rid of one’s greatest flaw, evil and enemy--the ego or the sense of I.

This piece was initially published in Bhutan’s national newspaper Kuensel in a series called "Why we do what we do".

Karma Phuntsho 2015 [2014]

Cham is a type of sacred dance unique to the Indo-Himalayan Buddhist culture. It is an extension of the Buddhist practice of visual offering of aesthetic movement, the mudra expression of enlightened spirit and of the artistic and entertaining expedience of passing a spiritual message.

This piece was initially published in Bhutan’s national newspaper Kuensel in a series called "Why we do what we do".

Karma Phuntsho 2015 [2014]

Mani is a popular ngag or mantra. Mani or oṃ maṇi padme huṃ, which is also known as the six syllable mantra, is the mantra of Avalokiteśvara or Chenrezig, the Buddha of compassion.

This piece was initially published in Bhutan’s national newspaper Kuensel in a series called "Why we do what we do".

Karma Phuntsho 2015 [2014]

There are different kinds of mantras. The innate mantra of reality is the ineffable nature of sound, which is simultaneously empty and audible. This state is expressed in the form of symbolic mantras, which are the syllables, letters and words, which we can chant and also hear.

This piece was initially published in Bhutan’s national newspaper Kuensel in a series called "Why we do what we do".

Karma Phuntsho 2015 [2014]

Chod is a very expedient Mahayana Buddhist practice primarily aimed at reducing and eliminating one’s sense of ego or attachment to oneself, using the tactics of fear and selfless giving.

This piece was initially published in Bhutan’s national newspaper Kuensel in a series called "Why we do what we do".

Karma Phuntsho 2015 [2014]

The recitation of Buddhist sutras is a very ancient tradition. After the Buddha passed away, his teachings were passed down orally for about three centuries. The master would recite and transmit the teachings to the disciple who will memorise, recite and pass it down again.

This piece was initially published in Bhutan’s national newspaper Kuensel in a series called "Why we do what we do".

Karma Phuntsho 2015 [2014]

The first month of the Bhutanese calendar is called Chothrul Dawa, literally the month of miracles. It is believed to be the month when Buddha performed many miracles.

This piece was initially published in Bhutan’s national newspaper Kuensel in a series called "Why we do what we do".

Karma Phuntsho 2015 [2014]

Due to its cultural diversity engendered by geographic isolation, Bhutan has many different losar (ལོ་གསར་) or New Year celebrations.

This piece was initially published in Bhutan’s national newspaper Kuensel in a series called "Why we do what we do".

Tay Keong Tan, Ph.D.

Notes:

Contemplative Practices for the 21st Century University

March 10-12, 2016

At the Inn at Virginia Tech and Skelton Conference Center, Blacksburg, Virginia

Karma Phuntsho 2015 [2014]

Domang is a collection of many important short sutras. It literally means ‘many sutras’. It is also known as Zungdue or a compendium of zung or dhāraṇī texts.

This piece was initially published in Bhutan’s national newspaper Kuensel in a series called "Why we do what we do".

Karma Phuntsho 2015 [2014]

Drubchen is an advanced form of ceremonial practice in Vajrayāna Buddhism.

This piece was initially published in Bhutan’s national newspaper Kuensel in a series called "Why we do what we do".

Karma Phuntsho 2015 [2014]

Saga Dawa, the fourth Bhutanese month and equivalent of Vaiṣakha month in Indian calendar, is a duezang. Duezang, literally means, auspicious time. Due refers to time and zang means auspicious or good.

This piece was initially published in Bhutan’s national newspaper Kuensel in a series called "Why we do what we do".

Sabine Grunwald*, Monika Ardelt, Ana Puig, Nancy J. Lasseter, Louis A. Ritz, Ferdinand Lewis, Angie Brown, Kim Holton, Jan Snyder, Nuengruetai F. (May) Dolen, Teresa Drake, Tina Tannen, Michael Murphy, Elaine Turner, Angela S. Lindner

Notes:

Contemplative Practices for the 21st Century University Conference

March 10-12, 2016

Blacksburg, Virginia

Christine Jewell
Karma Phuntsho 2015 [2014]

In general, Buddhism rejects the idea that someone else can save you. One is one’s own saviour and even the Buddhas are only teachers. The Buddha said: “I show you the path to liberation but liberation depends upon you.”

This piece was initially published in Bhutan’s national newspaper Kuensel in a series called "Why we do what we do".

Karma Phuntsho 2015 [2014]

Gyatongpa, literally ‘one with eight thousand’ is one of the most common books found in traditional Bhutan. It is the Perfection of Wisdom Sutra in Eight Thousand Verses also called Aśṭasāhasrikāprajñāpāramitāsūtrain Sanskrit.

This piece was initially published in Bhutan’s national newspaper Kuensel in a series called "Why we do what we do".

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